When it comes to animal rescues, it's been a busy week for the Meridian Fire Department. If it weren't for the crew on E-33 one duckling wouldn't have made it! 

It's that time of the year where you're likely going to see baby ducks or geese waddling behind their parents at least once a day. They hang out by the river, in people's pools and bring traffic to a screeching halt to cross the road. Unfortunately, sometimes these little find themselves in a little bit of trouble. That's exactly what to one family of ducks in Meridian on Thursday.

Get our free mobile app

E-33 was dispatched to rescue a family of ducklings who were trapped in a storm drain. The firemen were able to save the day and get all of them out of the drain. As they did so, they noticed that one of the ducks was no longer breathing. They administered oxygen and were able to get it breathing again. Unfortunately, Mommy Duck thought that her baby had died and took off with the other ducklings while the crew was treating the duckling who almost didn't make it.

Leaving the duckling behind wasn't an option, so they named him RJ, finished treating him at the firehouse and then took him out on a few calls. They were able to quickly find him a new home where he'll be loved and cared for. Reading through the comments on their Facebook post, it sounds like his new family includes some other ducks!

Listen to Michelle Heart mornings on 107.9 LITE-FM and download the free LITE-FM app to win cash, up to $10,000 with the Payroll Payout! 

You can see some photos of the rescue and RJ's care HERE. 

Earlier this week, E-34 rescued four kittens from an home's HVAC floor vents. After being cared for by a local vet, they were immediately adopted!

WAY TO GO MERIDIAN FIRE!!!

LOOK: Stunning animal photos from around the world

From grazing Tibetan antelope to migrating monarch butterflies, these 50 photos of wildlife around the world capture the staggering grace of the animal kingdom. The forthcoming gallery runs sequentially from air to land to water, and focuses on birds, land mammals, aquatic life, and insects as they work in pairs or groups, or sometimes all on their own.