My love for fishing developed in my early 20s when I moved to Alaska. I grew up in Arizona and while I fished a little here and there during family mountain trips, I didn't fully appreciate the joy of fishing until Alaska showed me the way. Fast forward over a decade and Idaho has it going on when it comes to fishing. Just this past weekend my man and I caught 8 fish between us at Red Fish Lake in Stanley Idaho while on paddleboards with my pup Ani chillin on my board the whole time. <3 While I love fishing for the sport, I also love eating my wins, but after they are fully gutted, cleaned and cooked.

That is not the case for NFL Leonard Williams who also loves to fish. He however has a very different and discussing way of celebrating and eating his catches. Leonard went deep sea fishing over the weekend and got a giant Bluefin Tuna. The New York Giants defensive end stuck his hand through the gill ripped the beating heart out... As if that isn't enough he then ate it while it was still beating. He then chewed it up and swallowed it all on camera. If you can handle it watch the video on his Instagram below.


Leonard even mentions that it is tradition, which is true in some cases. According to Game and Fish Magazine, Eating the heart of a prey was a hunting and fishing tradition in many Native American tribes. It was believed that doing so would allow the hunter to absorb the qualities of the animal.

As you can imagine animal rights groups are not happy. The Blue Planet Society, a group dedicated to campaigning against the exploitation of the world's oceans are not ok with it at all. According to Insider, The Blue Planet Society claims that the fish was an endangered species on The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

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